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Safety first
Great Western Branch Health Bulletin #2
8 October 2020

Great Western Branch Health Bulletin #1

Healthy lifestyle heart graphic

Your Health & Safety leads are

 

Healthy Lifestyle

Whatever your age we all need to watch what we eat and keep our selves active as we all have busy lifestyles these days, Getting yourself fit and keeping fit has lots of benefits: - Boosts our mood, self-esteem, confidence, energy, and sleep Increases our aerobic fitness, our flexibility and muscle strength Reduces our risk of developing heart problems, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some cancers Helps us control our weight, blood pressure and cholesterol Reduces stress

How much physical activity should you do?

Try to be physically active and maintain a healthy bodyweight (BMI 18.5-25 Kg/m2) to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. It is recommended that adults choose activities that include aerobic and strength exercises. The recommended minimum amount of physical activity for adults per week is 150 minutes of moderate level aerobic activity (this should raise your heart rate and make you breathe faster and feel warmer) or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity (this should make you breathe hard and fast) on two or more days a week. Walking, dancing, swimming, gardening, golf, bowling and cycling are all activities that count towards physical activity. In the UK it is recommend that a healthy varied diet is based on starchy foods and plenty of fruit and vegetables and is low in saturated fat sugar and salt. These recommendations are based on the latest evidence and apply to the general population.



https://www.nutrition.org.uk/healthyliving/healthydiet.html
 

Healthy Lifestyle

Whatever your age we all need to watch what we eat and keep our selves active as we all have busy lifestyles these days, Getting yourself fit and keeping fit has lots of benefits: - Boosts our mood, self-esteem, confidence, energy, and sleep Increases our aerobic fitness, our flexibility and muscle strength Reduces our risk of developing heart problems, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some cancers Helps us control our weight, blood pressure and cholesterol Reduces stress

How much physical activity should you do?

Try to be physically active and maintain a healthy bodyweight (BMI 18.5-25 Kg/m2) to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. It is recommended that adults choose activities that include aerobic and strength exercises. The recommended minimum amount of physical activity for adults per week is 150 minutes of moderate level aerobic activity (this should raise your heart rate and make you breathe faster and feel warmer) or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity (this should make you breathe hard and fast) on two or more days a week. Walking, dancing, swimming, gardening, golf, bowling and cycling are all activities that count towards physical activity. In the UK it is recommend that a healthy varied diet is based on starchy foods and plenty of fruit and vegetables and is low in saturated fat sugar and salt. These recommendations are based on the latest evidence and apply to the general population.


https://www.nutrition.org.uk/healthyliving/healthydiet.html

Coronary heart disease

The most common symptom of coronary heart disease is chest pain (angina).You can also experience other symptoms, such as palpitations and unusual breathlessness. Some people may not have any symptoms before they are diagnosed.

Angina
If your coronary arteries become partially blocked, it can cause chest pain (angina).This can be a mild, uncomfortable feeling similar to indigestion. However, a severe angina attack can cause a painful feeling of heaviness or tightness, usually in the centre of the chest, which may spread to the arms, neck, jaw, back or stomach. Angina is often triggered by physical activity or stressful situations. Symptoms usually pass in less than 10 minutes and can be relieved by resting or using a nitrate tablet or spray. Read more about treating angina.

Heart attacks.
If your arteries become completely blocked, it can cause a heart attack (myocardial infarction). Heart attacks can permanently damage the heart muscle and, if not treated straight away, can be fatal. Pain in other parts of the body - it can feel as if the pain is travelling from your chest to your arms, jaw, neck, back and abdomen symptoms of a heart attack can also be similar to indigestion. For example, they may include a feeling of heaviness in your chest, a stomach-ache or heartburn. A heart attack can occur at any time, including while you are resting. If heart pains last longer than 15 minutes, it may be the start of a heart attack. In some cases, a heart attack can occur without any symptoms. This is known as a silent myocardial infarction and is more common in elderly people and people with diabetes. See last safety bulletin for more information on type 1 & 2 diabetes.

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) Helpline 03000 030 555

The most common signs of OSA are snoring, interrupted breathing while you are asleep and feeling sleepy when you are awake Have a look at the full list of symptoms below – not everyone with OSA will experience them all. Talk to your GP if you have a combination of daytime and night-time symptom.

When asleep

  • Snoring
  • Stopping breathing
  • Struggling to breathe
  • Feeling of choking
  • Tossing and turning
  • Sudden jerky body movements
  • Needing to go to the toilet at night
  • Your partner might be more aware of Your snoring and pauses in your Breathing than you are

When awake

  • Waking up sleepy & unrefreshed
  • Headache in the morning
  • Difficulty concentrating and feeling groggy, dull and less alert
  • Poor memory
  • Feeling depressed, irritable or other changes in mood
  • Poor coordination
  • Loss of sex drive, heart burn and poor quality of life

Why is it important to diagnose and treat OSA?

OSA can affect your – and your partner’s - quality of life. It can also lead to other health problems, including heart attack (30% higher risk), irregular heartbeat such as atrial fibrillation, high blood pressure, stroke and diabetes. You are more likely to have accidents at work and on the road. And your ability to work may be affected.

You are more likely to have OSA if:

  • you are a man and middle aged.
  • You are a woman past your menopause.
  • You are overweight or obese, have a large neck size - 17 inches or more.
  • You have a small airway, a set-back lower jaw or a small lower jaw, large tonsils, a large tongue or nasal blockage.
  • You have a medical condition that makes some of these factors more likely such as Down’s syndrome.

OSA can be made worse by drinking alcohol, using sedatives such as sleeping pills and smoking. If you think you might have OSA, google "Epworth Sleepiness Scale test". This helps to assess how likely you are to fall asleep in everyday situations. Take this along to your GP to talk about your symptoms and concerns. Your GP will ask about your symptoms, your health and your medical history, and about how sleepy you are when awake. Your GP might give you lifestyle advice about the best ways to get a good night’s sleep, lose weight and stop smoking. If it is suspected that you might have OSA, you will usually be referred to a sleep clinic. Where you can be assessed, diagnosed and get treatment for a range of sleep problems including OSA. Clinics assess people in different ways. Some arrange for you to have an overnight sleep study at home before you visit, while others see you first before deciding if you need an overnight study.

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